William Clarke Quantrill Society

Missouri Partisan Rangers

info@wcqsociety.com

William Clarke Quantrill Society

Reunion 2012

"One Day in the Life of Quantrill's Guerrillas"

2012 Reunion Group

On Saturday, October 13, 2012 the William Clarke Quantrill Society enjoyed a historical tour that focused on the activities of Quantrill's Guerrillas on the momentous day of March 22, 1862.

Several sites we visited associated with that one day include: the 27th Street Bridge site over the Blue River (skirmish and bridge burned), Alexander Majors house, New Santa Fe (or Little Santa Fe) town site and cemetery and the probable site of the famous Tate House Shootout where the Guerrillas were surrounded by 200 Federal Troops and fought their way out. Along the way we visited several Battle of Westport sites, the Forest Hill Confederate Monument and a newly discovered site for the ambush of Henry Younger.

Society Awards Banquet
Photo by Kathleen Miller, Courtesy of the Lone Jack Historical Society.

President Harold recognized and presented Alinda Miller, Lone Jack Historical Society, the Don Hale Award.

The William Clarke Quantrill Society Banquet was held at the Rheinland Restaurant, 208 North Main, Independence, Missouri. Members enjoyed authentic German Cuisine located one half block off the Independence Square.

Big Blue River Crossing

Big Blue River Crossing

The actual crossing site of the Big Blue River near old US Highway 40 is no longer visible. Traders who went from Independence to Westport to outfit used this less popular crossing of the Big Blue. The ruts going northwest up the steep hill west of the river are still visible at 27th and Topping Avenue.

One Day in the Life of Quantrill's Guerrillas

Forest Hill

Forest Hill Cemetery is on the site of the celebrated Confederate cavalryman General Joseph Orville Shelby's heroic stand that saved General Sterling Price's army. A large Confederate monument in the cemetery is surrounded by graves of the Confederate dead, including Shelby.

New Santa Fe

Santa Fe Cemetery

New Santa Fe

The town of New Santa Fe (or Little Santa Fe, as some call it) stood at the junction of the Santa Fe Trail and State Line Road, now southwest Kansas City. The little village had great historical significance in the development of western commerce in the 19th century.

Swales

Swales

From 1821 until the 1870s when the railroads were completed, a person could stand in the midst of what is now Minor Park at Holmes Road and 110th streets, and watch the wagon trains go by. That area was part of the highway to the West: the Santa Fe, Oregon and California Trails. The weight of the wagons, plus the multitudes of emigrants, traders and animals, left their mark in the land. The ruts, also known as Swales, are still visible today. A pink granite Daughter of the American Revolution marker was erected in about 1909 to commemorate the historic site.

Trailside Center

Trailside Center

Located just off of 3-Trails Crossing Memorial Highway in the heart of the historic 3-Trails Corridor, Trailside Center provides resources for trail and civil war afictionados, historians, and the Kansas City community.

William Clarke Quantrill Society Awards Banquet

2012 William Clarke Quantrill Society Annual Meeting

The William Clarke Quantrill Society Banquet was held at the Rheinland Restaurant, 208 North Main, Independence, Missouri. Members enjoyed authentic German Cuisine located one half block off the Independence Square.

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