William Clarke Quantrill Society

Missouri Partisan Rangers

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William Clarke Quantrill Society

Quantrill's Men

Sketches & Biographical Notes Courtesy of Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City, Missouri.

The Missouri-Kansas border war, prior to and during the Civil War, resulted in larger than life legends-William Quantrill, Jesse and Frank James, and William "Bloody Bill" Anderson. These infamous men captured the imagination of many people, including two artists who chose to memorialize some of Quantrill's Guerrillas, the James-Younger gang, and others associated with them like Brigadier General Joseph Orville Shelby.

This digital collection consists of 52 charcoal portraits created by A. L. Dillenbeck and Elmer Stewart. It appears that both artists used photographs as a basis for their drawings. Dillenbeck's drawings are not dated but are believed to have been created in the late 1800s. Stewart added "93" under his signature.

Archie Clements
Archibald Clements (Arch or Little Archie)

At age 17 became William ("Bloody Bill") Anderson's lieutenant. It is said that in one short year Clements eclipsed the record of every known guerrilla by killing 54 men. He was part of Quantrill's famous raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863, and a major player in the Centralia, Missouri, massacre. After the Civil War he took up robbing banks until he was killed December 13, 1866, in Lexington, Missouri, at age 19.

Babe Hudspeth
William Napoleon (Babe) Hudspeth

One of four brothers from eastern Jackson County that rode with Quantrill and Bill Anderson. He participated in the raid on Lawrence, Kansas, (August 21, 1863) and the Centralia, Missouri, massacre (September 1864). After the Civil War he lived on his farm in Jackson County and bred horses. He died in 1907.

Ben Broomfield
Benjamin (Ben) Broomfield

Was with Quantrill and Bill Anderson, who "called him his own Indian." Broomfield was part Comanche. He took part in the Lawrence, Kansas, massacre on August 21, 1863. Facts do not correlate about his death. Broomfield was killed either in 1863 or 1864.

William Anderson
William (Bill) T. Anderson

Chief lieutenant under William Clarke Quantrill and earned the sobriquet "Bloody Bill." He later was a lieutenant under George Todd. He was part of the Lawrence massacre on August 21, 1863, and responsible for much of the Centralia, Missouri, massacre on September 27, 1864. He was killed October 26, 1864, near Orrick (Ray County), Missouri.

Dick Yeager
Richard (Dick) Yeager

Son of James B. Yeager, a judge who served in the state legislature for two years and as presiding judge of the Jackson County Court in 1840. James owned a freight business running the Santa Fe Trail, and before the war, Dick was in charge of one of his father's wagon trains. When his father's farm was raided, Dick joined Quantrill's guerrillas. He was part of Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863, and is also known for a daring raid in the vicinity of Council Grove, Kansas, on May 4, 1863. There are several versions of his death, which occurred around July or August 1864.

Fletch Taylor
Charles Fletcher (Fletch) Taylor

One of the first members of Quantrill's raiders. He took part in the Lawrence, Kansas, massacre on August 21, 1863, and lost his arm from a gunshot wound in 1864. After the war he became a wealthy and respected citizen as vice president and general superintendent of the Joplin Mining and Smelting Co. Date of death is uncertain but may have been sometime between August 1916 and August 1917.

John Jarrette
John Jarrette

Served as a captain under Quantrill and was married to the Younger brothers' sister Josephine. He also was a member of the James-Younger Gang.

John McCorkle
John McCorkle

Born December 12, 1838, in Andrew County, Missouri, moved to a farm near Westport around 1846. In April 1861 he enlisted in Company A of the Missouri State Guards, but in August 1862 he became part of Quantrill's guerrillas. In 1865, McCorkle surrendered at Newcastle, Kentucky, along with George Wigginton and a Confederate Captain Stone. They were paroled.

Tom Maupin
Thomas (Tom) Maupin

Part of Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863, and the Centralia, Missouri, massacre on September 27, 1864. "Weekly Graphic" of Kirksville, Missouri, April 7, 1882, page 1, relates that Maupin owned several cattle ranches in Texas. Other sources say he was killed near Rocheport on May 24, 1865.

William Gregg
William Gregg

One of the first to join Quantrill's gang in December 1861 and one of the first to leave (December 1863) when Quantrill began losing control of the bushwackers. That same month Gregg joined General Joseph Shelby's brigade and was made a First Lieutenant in command of Company I. After the war, Gregg lived in Kansas City and became a deputy sheriff for Jackson County. He died at the age of 78 on April 22, 1916, in Kansas City and is buried in Forest Hill Cemetery.

Bill Hulse
William (Bill) Hulse

Member of Quantrill's guerrillas, Hulse participated in the raid on Lawrence, Kansas, in August 1863, the massacre at Centralia, Missouri, September 1864. On July 26, 1865, he surrendered at Samuel's Depot, Kentucky. Hulse died in 1890 and is buried in the Lee's Summit, Missouri, cemetery.

Cole Younger
Thomas Coleman (Cole) Younger

Active in several Civil War battles and a member of Quantrill's guerrillas when they raided Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863, and was part of the Baxter Springs massacre, October 6, 1863. After the war, he joined with Frank and Jesse James in several robberies. After the Northfield, Minnesota, bank robbery on September 7, 1876, he was arrested and sent to prison at Stillwater, Minnesota. He was granted a full pardon in 1903. He died March 21, 1916, at Lee's Summit, Missouri, and is buried in the Lee's Summit Cemetery.

Dick Burns
Richard (Dick) Burns

Enlisted in 1861 and served under Quantrill. He took part in the Lawrence massacre on August 21, 1863. After the war he was a member of the James-Younger Gang and participated in the Richmond, Missouri, bank robbery on May 23, 1867. The Richmond posse found Burns "sleeping in a farmhouse within two miles of Richmond. He was taken outside and strung up on a convenient elm"

Frank James
Alexander Franklin (Frank) James

The older brother of Jesse, first joined the Missouri State Guard, but later became a member of Quantrill's guerrillas. Frank took part in many Civil War battles and skirmishes, including the raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863, and the Centralia massacre. He surrendered at Samuel's Depot, Kentucky, at the end of the war. He was a member of the James-Younger gang and participated in numerous robberies, and although tried for some of these, was acquitted. He died of a stroke February 15, 1915. He is buried in the Hill family private cemetery near Kansas City.

Joe Lea
Joe Lea

Son of the noted Lee's Summit physician Dr. Pleasant Lea, Joe Lea was a member of Quantrill's Guerrillas. He was wounded during the raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863. After the Civil War, Lea moved to Roswell, New Mexico, where he became a buffalo hunter, lawman, rancher, banker, and instructor in the military department at the University of New Mexico.

Upton Hayes
Upton Hayes

Great grandson of Daniel Boone, lived in Westport. He enlisted in the Second Missouri Calvary in 1861 and fought in the early battles of Carthage, Missouri, July 5, 1861; Wilson's Creek, Missouri, August 10, 1861; Pea Ridge, Arkansas, March 9, 1862; and others. Hays was killed in the battle of Newtonia, Missouri, on September 30, 1862. "In 1898, the United Daughters of the Confederacy exhumed his body and reburied it in the Confederate Cemetery at Westport, now known as the Forest Hills Cemetery"

William Clarke Quantrill
William Clarke Quantrill

Captain William Clarke Quantrill was the most noted of all guerrilla leaders. His commission was as Captain of Cavalry Scouts for the Confederates. He led the raid or massacre on Lawrence, Kansas, on August 21, 1863. After the Battle of Westport in October 1864, Quantrill went to Kentucky where he was mortally wounded by Federal soldiers. He was taken to a hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, where he died June 6, 1865, at the age of 27.

Alan Parmer
Alan Parmer

Allen Parmer took part in the raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863, the Centralia massacre September 27, 1864, and numerous other skirmishes. In 1870 he married Jesse James' sister Susan. The Parmers lived mostly in Texas after the Civil War. He died in Wichita Falls, Texas, October 25, 1927.

Andrew McGuire
Andrew McGuire

McGuire was part of Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863, and Centralia, Missouri, September 27, 1864. He surrendered at Samuel's Depot, Kentucky, July 25, 1865. In May 1867, 14 men held up the bank in Richmond, Missouri. A warrant was issued for McGuire's arrest in connection with the robbery. He was arrested in St. Louis and taken to the Richmond city jail. On March 20, 1868, a mob of 15 stormed the jail and lynched McGuire along with James M. Devers.

Baxter Mitchell
Baxter Mitchell

Little is known about Baxter Mitchell, who may also be Baker Mitchell, except that he took part in Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863.

Charles Sanders
Charles Sanders

Charles Sanders served with Quantrill and was part of the raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863. While recuperating at the home of Mrs. Richard Kinney in Jackson County from wounds, Sanders was shot and killed in March 1865 by Captain J. W. Sheets' company of soldiers.

Frank Shepherd
Frank Shepherd

Frank Shepherd served under Quantrill and Bill Anderson. He was part of the Lawrence, Kansas, massacre on August 21, 1863. During the Centralia, Missouri, battle on September 27, 1864, he rode on one side of Frank James; Richard Kinney on the other side. Both Kinney and Shepherd were killed, but James escaped unharmed.

George Wigginton
George Wigginton

George Wigginton, along with his cousin John McCorkle, joined Quantrill in August of 1862. He fought at Independence, August 11, 1862. He went to Kentucky with Quantrill and fought at Worthville. "John McCorkle and his cousin George Wigginton attached themselves to a regular Confederate command and surrendered to ensure that they received honorable terms" (Pettersen, Paul R. "Quantrill of Missouri." Nashville, TN: Cumberland House, 2003, pp. 409-410 [MVSC 973,742 Q12ZP].) After the war, Wigginton lived in Lee's Summit. He received the Southern Cross of Honor from Independence Chapter, U.D.C. in 1913. He died at Boulder, Colorado, on August 21, 1918, and was buried in Lee's Summit cemetery.

Harrison Trow
Harrison Trow

Harrison Trow served under Quantrill and was at the Lawrence massacre, August 21, 1863, and Centralia, September 27, 1864, as well as the Battle of Independence, August 11, 1862. After the war, Trow lived in Blue Springs, Missouri, until 1901 when he moved to Texas where he died February 24, 1925. He identified the body of Jesse James after James was shot. With the help of John P. Burch, Trow wrote a book about Quantrill and the border war.

James Robert Cummins
James Robert Cummins

Jim Cummins was a neighbor to the James family near Kearney, Missouri. He, along with Jese James, Doc Rupe, Silas King, and Tom Smith joined the regular service of the Confederacy under Colonel Calhoun Thornton. Later he and Jesse joined the guerrillas. Jim was not at Lawrence, but was at the Centralia massacre, September 27, 1864. After the war, some believe he was at some point a member of the James-Younger gang. Cummins sometimes used the alias Jim Johnson. He periodically stayed at the Confederate Home near Higginsville, Missouri, until his death on July 9, 1929. He is buried in the Veterans Cemetery in Higginsville.

James Younger
James Younger

Jim Younger, brother to Robert (Bob) and Thomas Coleman (Cole), joined Quantrill's group in 1863. He was part of the Centralia, Missouri, massacre, September 27, 1864. He went with Quantrill to Kentucky near the end of the war and was captured about April 1865. After the war he moved to Texas and in 1870 and 1871 was deputy sherrif of Dallas County, Texas. He later joined the James-Younger gang and was part of the Northfield, Minnesota, bank robbery on September 7, 1876. He was arrested with his brothers and sent to prison at Stillwater, Minnesota. Jim was paroled in 1901 and committed suicide in Minnesota on October 19, 1902. He's buried at the Lee's Summit, Missouri, Cemetery.

Jesse Hamlett
Jesse Hamlett

Little is known about Jesse Hamlett. He appears to have served under William Anderson and was part of the Centralia, Missouri, September 27, 1864, massacre. He also may have been one of the U.S. Marshalls at Lexington, Missouri, after the war.

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