William Clarke Quantrill Society

Missouri Partisan Rangers

info@wcqsociety.com

William Clarke Quantrill Society

Announcement: Events

Following in Quantrill’s Footsteps

On August 17th, dust kicked up throughout western Missouri into Kansas, only this time it wasn’t from Quantrill’s guerrillas riding into Lawrence. Instead, it was from two tour buses making their way along the route believed to be once taken by William Clarke Quantrill on his way to carry out one of the bloodiest massacres in Civil War history. Just as dawn approached on August 21, 1863, Quantrill and his men charged into Lawrence, Kansas and within only a few short hours they managed to destroy almost the entire town, leaving behind approximately 200 dead men and boys. In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s raid on Lawrence, Kansas, a two-day bus tour gave the public the opportunity to see the route believed to be taken by Quantrill and to understand the terrain, heat, and obstacles the guerrillas had to overcome to get to Lawrence. Quantrill’s incredibly dangerous trek into Kansas was the result of a two and a half year continuous attack on Missourians by Kansas Jayhawkers and Redlegs. Women and children watched as their men were killed, heirlooms taken, houses burned, and on occasion they even fell victim to physical attacks. The Kansas City women’s prison collapse that occurred on August 13, 1863, killing five female relatives of the guerrillas, only made the attack on Lawrence bloodier. Neutrality wasn’t an option and if you were of Southern blood, you were targeted. The border war between Kansas and Missouri is much more than a rivalry between the University of Kansas and the University of Missouri, it was full of bloodshed.

At 8:00 a.m. on August 17, 2013, the tour began in Harrisonville, Missouri located in Cass County, one of the four counties destroyed by Brigadier General Thomas Ewing’s Order No. 11.

Order No. 11 exhibit

This picture was taken at the Order No. 11 exhibit being displayed at the Kansas City Box Gallery.

On August 25, 1863, in response to the Lawrence raid and at the demand of Kansas Senator General James Henry Lane, Ewing issued Order No. 11 which mandated an evacuation of all persons currently residing in Jackson, Cass, and Bates Counties, and part of Vernon County. Families were forced to leave their homes in 100 degree heat and most had to walk to the next county while watching the sick and elderly dying more »

William Clarke Quantrill

Quantrill and his men
Images Copyright Unknown, Courtesy of Harry S. Truman Library.

The William Clarke Quantrill Society, Inc. is a Missouri Not-for-Profit corporation dedicated to the study of the Border War and the War of Northern Aggression on the Missouri-Kansas border with an emphasis on the lives of Quantrill, his men, his supporters, his adversaries, and the resulting historical record. We also collect and disseminate genealogical information about Quantrill, his men and their descendents.

Osceola, Missouri

Above: The Youngers would hide out in a cave which overlooked the Osage River near Monegaw Springs. On a high bluff was the Younger's Lookout where they could could see for miles.

The William Clarke Quantrill Society publishes a newsletter called the "No Quarterly," conducts an annual reunion, and cosponsors several other events. See our membership page for additional information.